Dream Catcher Tattoo

History of Dreamcatchers

Now that we have all that out of the way, let’s talk about the cool stuff. Dreamcatchers. While popular, dreamcatchers do not feature in all Native American cultures. They are very common across the nations, but their origin lies somewhere with the Lakota, Ojibwe (Chippewa), Sioux, and their neighboring tribes. Obviously, this huge swath of different cultures and locations barely narrows it down, so determining exactly where they originated proves impossible.

In the 60s and 70s, the Pan-Indian movement sought to unify many different American Indian tribes across the nations to better coordinate their protest of some shady government claims. While many tribes already formed a coalition of nations—even before the Europeans landed on the continent—this surge represented the largest movement to fight back for their land.

During the Pan-Indian movement, many different tribes shared the unique quirks of their particular tribes and bands. During this time, the dreamcatcher became a popular symbol for many different tribes across a huge swath of North America. People easily recognized it, and it looked awesome. To this day, dreamcatchers appear in traditional shops far away from their original location.

During this time, the dreamcatcher became a popular symbol for many different tribes across a huge swath of North America. People easily recognized it, and it looked awesome. To this day, dreamcatchers appear in traditional shops far away from their original location.

Dream catcher Tattoo why do hold such popularity?

What purpose do they serve, what do dreamcatchers mean, and what kind of history do they have?

let’s look back at the legends of the Lakota tribe. A variant is found in many other tribes, with different names and meanings, but this one is the first I could find in the public domain.

but this one is the first I could find in the public domain.

A long time ago, a Lakota spiritual leader received a vision on a mountain.

He saw the spider trickster Iktomi appear and speak to him in a language that only the spiritual leaders can hear. The spider took the feathered willow hoop of the spiritual leader and began to spin a web while he spoke.

The spider took the feathered willow hoop of the spiritual leader and began to spin a web while he spoke.

He spoke of the cycle of life—we begin as an infant, grow into adulthood, and return to infanthood as a fragile old person who must be cared for.