Lord Ganesha Tattoo

Lord Ganesha Tattoo

Ganesha is the formless Divinity – encapsulated in a magnificent form, for the benefit of the devotee. As per Hindu mythology, he is the son of Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati.

Gan means group. The universe is a group of atoms and different energies. This universe would be in chaos if there was no supreme law governing these diverse groups of entities.
The Lord of all these groups of atoms and energies is Ganesha.
He is the supreme consciousness that pervades all and brings order in this universe.

Ganesh is usually depicted colored red; he is pot bellied, has one tusk broken, and has four arms that may hold a noose called a pasam, an elephant goad, and a pot of rice, or his favorite  sweets, laddus. His appetite for these sweets is legendary and offerings of them are often left at his shrine.

pasam or noose is a triple twine weapon. Each of the three twines represent: 1. Arrogance and conceit, 2. Maya – the illusory nature of the real world, and 3. Ignorance.

Mythological Customized Tattoo of Lord Shiva's Trishul, Damru & Snake - Tattoo Studio in India

Mythological Customized Tattoo of Lord Shiva’s Trishul, Damru & Snake

Mythological Customized Tattoo of Lord Shiva’s Trishul, Damru & Snake

Trishula Tattoo Designs – The Trishula is the three-pronged weapon and emblem of Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction. Also spelled, ‘trishul’ or ‘trisula’, it comes from the Sanskrit language where tri means ‘three’ and shula means ‘spear’.

The Trishula has come to symbolize several important ‘triads’. First, there is the Hindu trinity of deities – Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. It also stands for the aspects and powers associated with these gods — Creation, Preservation and Destruction.

The three feminine (shakti) powers of will, action, and wisdom are also symbolized by the Trishula.

Three more symbols of the design are desire, will, and love.

Not to be overlooked, are the the trishula design’s potent symbolism of past, present and future. In Buddhism, the Trishula is symbolic of the Three Jewels – right knowledge, right belief, right action. In the Tibetan tradition, it is a magical weapon carried by the protective deities in their battles with evil forces.

As a weapon it is also associated with the goddess, Durga, one of Shiva’s many consorts. She brandishes it in one of her seven hands as she ferociously takes on enemy demons. A Hindu myth describes Shiva striking his son with the trishula, the power of the weapon so great that it sent the lad’s head flying so far it could not be found.